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ABSTRACT

A study applied Relevance Theory to interpretation of textswritten in Ghanaian English, particularly those intended for reading bymultiple audiences. The nature of such "hybrid" texts is examined and keyprinciples of Relevance Theory are outlined. Relevance is defined in terms ofcontextual effect and processing effort. Contextual effects are achieved whennew information interacts with a context of already existing assumptions inone of several ways; the greater the effort required to derive contextualeffects (processing effort), the lower the relevance of the content. Inaddition, however, the greater the contextual effect, the greater therelevance. Analysis of several texts looks at contextualization,lexico-semantic variation, and syntactic variation. Proverbs are alsoconsidered, as a subcategory of hybrid text. It is concluded that two formsof relevance emerge from processing of hybrid texts: mother-tongue relevanceand other-tongue relevance, and variation in assumptions that underlies thisprocess is particularly great between different cultures. Contains 22references.(MSE)

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Preface 5

 

1 Introduction 7

 

1.1 What is this thesis about? 7

 

1.2 Coptic and the relevance of its research 9

 

1.2.1 The definition of Coptic 9

 

1.2.2 Vocalization, dialects and the Greek-Egyptian contact 10

 

1.2.3 Prehistory 16

 

1.3 The Coptic dialects 17

 

1.3.1 How many dialects are there and how are they related? 17

 

1.3.2 Names and sigla, the Kasser-Funk Agreement 19

 

1.3.3 The major literary dialects, dialectal groups from the south to the north 20

 

1.3.4 The current state of research 27

 

1.4 The sources 28

 

2 The Coptic noun 32

 

2.1 Terminology 33

 

2.2 Morphology 34

 

2.2.1 Gender, number and case 34

 

2.2.2 The remnant morphological plural – some considerations 38

 

2.3 On the edge of nominality 40

 

2.3.1 Is there an adjectival category in Coptic? 40

 

2.3.2 No verbs in Coptic? Once more on a problem of categorization 45

 

2.3.3 How nominal are the Copto-Greek verbs? 47

 

2.4 Determination 56

 

2.5 Adnominal modification 63

 

2.5.1 Possessive constructions 65

 

2.5.2 Attributive constructions 67

 

2.5.3 Partitive constructions 71

 

2.5.4 Quantification 72

 

3 Determination 75

 

3.1 Where do Coptic determiners come from? 75

 

3.2 Forms and use of the determiners in Sahidic 78

 

3.1.1 Articles, demonstratives and possessives 78

 

3.1.2 Special cases of determination 80

 

4

 

3.3 Alternative systems: a dialectal perspective 83

 

3.3.1 The case of Bohairic 83

 

3.3.2 The case of Mesokemic 88

 

3.3.3 The case of early Fayyumic 93

 

4 Possessive constructions in Coptic 95

 

4.1 The Sahidic distribution: Pattern A and B 95

 

4.2 Aspects of obligatory definiteness 112

 

4.2.1 The construct state phenomenon 112

 

4.2.2 The direct and indirect genitive constructions of Earlier Egyptian 113

 

4.2.3 Change and conservation 118

 

4.3 Possessive constructions in the early Coptic dialects – a comparative study 121

 

4.3.1 Lycopolitan 123

 

4.3.2 Akhmimic 126

 

4.3.3 Bohairic 128

 

4.3.4 Mesokemic 140

 

4.3.3 Dialect W 142

 

4.3.3 Fayyumic 144

 

5 Attributive constructions – a diachronic perspective 147

 

5.1. Attribution vs. possession 147

 

5.2 Reconstruction of the diachronic process: origin and development 148

 

5.2.1 Motivation 148

 

5.2.2 Syntactic and semantic preconditions for the n-marked attribution 149

 

5.2.3 Generalized adnominal modifier-marker 153

 

5.2.4 Problems with defining the exact time of the grammaticalization 154

 

5.3 Concluding remarks on the Coptic construction types 155

 

6 Conclusion 156

 

List of abbreviations 158

 

References 159

 

 

CONTENTS

 

 

 

A Bibliography of Alexander Fodor’s Publications (1969-2015) ............. xiii

 

Francesca M. Corrao (Rome): Some Observations on Humour in Islamic Culture ……………………………………………………………………...1

 

Kinga Dévényi (Budapest): Manuscripts of Enʿām-i Şerīf in the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences ……...................................................... 9

 

Ida Fröhlich (Piliscsaba): “Because He Loves Her …”: The Figure of the Demon in the Book of Tobit …..................................................................... 25

 

Antonella Ghersetti (Venise): Des lièvres et des djinns : notice sur une amulette préislamique dans les sources arabes .......................................... 37

 

Amad asan (Asyut): Dirāsa naqdiyya li-aqwāl Rābiʿa al-ʿAdawiyya (d. ca. 185/801) fī t-turāṯ al-islāmī ................................................................... 51

 

Tamás Iványi (Budapest): On Circumambulation in Chellah and Elsewhere:

 

Popular Traditions, Legal Prohibitions ...................................................... 65

 

Alan Jones (Oxford): So That You May Be Reminded ................................ 99

 

István Ormos (Budapest): Between Stage Décor and Reality: The Cairo Street at the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 at Chicago ............. 115

 

Anne Regourd (Copenhague, Paris): al-Mandal as-sulaymānī appliqué : une

 

section interpolée dans le ms. Sanaa 2774 ? ............................................ 135

 

Gabriel M. Rosenbaum (Jerusalem): Shabbat (Saturday) in Modern Egypt: Customs and Their Reflection in Spoken Judeo-Arabic ............................ 153

 

Avihai Shivtiel (Cambridge): On a Known Unknown Strophic Poem from the Cairo Genizah: An Authentic or a Plagiarized Version? .................... 167

 

Dóra Zsom (Budapest): Another Arabic Version of Sefer ha-Razim and arba de-Moše: A New Sifr Ādam Manuscript ........................................ 179

 

List of Contributors ................................................................................... 203

 

Volumes of The Arabist published so far .................................................. 207

 

 

 

 

 

4. oldal / 191
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